Finally! A Printable Character Map of the Wingdings Fonts

When you need an icon or symbol, like a lightning bolt or checkmark, it’s sometimes hard to navigate the different Wingdings and Webdings fonts.

So I created this handy printable cheat sheet for an at-a-glance view of all available symbols. Click here for a printable version.

I was inspired to create this cheat sheet by this video, by presentation trainer Matthew Trump, showing how to create icons from the Wingdings font. Visit Matthew’s site here.

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.

The #1 Problem with Tables: Sorting Data Alphabetically

I review a lot of PowerPoint decks created by market research firms. And I continue to see a problem with how they present data in tables: sorting the data alphabetically.

There are several problems with this, but the biggest issue is that there are important patterns in your data that are jumbled up, and often even wrong, when you sort the data alphabetically.

Here’s an example. In this table, sorted alphabetically, our product looks pretty good next to the competion.

But hold on! When we sort this data based on importance (second column) a different message appears! Suddenly, our product flaws are glaringly obvious.

Sorting alphbetically is correct in some cases, especially when the reader needs to look information up: line items in financial statements, lists of countries or states, and so on.

But when you want to find and present the insightful patterns in your table data, resist the automatic urge to sort it alphabetically. Instead, find the meaning in your data by sorting it some other way, such as highest to lowest or most important to least important. Your message will really pop!

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.

Cheat Sheet for Creating Numbers Inside Circles

Sometimes it comes in handy to use numbers within your text to refer to numbers in your diagram. Like this slide.

You might just use a circle shape with a number inside it. But then, when you update the text, you also have to move the circle around manually. Time-consuming!

Instead, use the Windings2 font. It creates a number inside a circle that stays in place even as you update your text. You can also change the font size without having to resize the circle. Here’s a handy printable cheat sheet.

 

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.

Quit Boring your Audience: the Best Way to Get them Interested

The typical advice to presenters is almost guaranteed to bore your audience to death: think about what you want the audience to think/feel/do differently after your presentation.

Well meaning advice. But completely wrong.

We’ve all been to those presentations, haven’t we? The presenter tries humor, storytelling, hyperbole and other techniques to get you to care. But their agenda is transparent: it’s all about what they want.

If there’s a “what’s in it for me” for the audience, it’s not a sincere interest in you. It’s merely an angle to lure you over to the speaker’s way of thinking. This guarantees the talk will be intended to serve one person’s needs: the speaker’s. Boring!

Here’s a better approach: Take a pen and write two lists on your whiteboard. On the left, list everything you want to talk about. On the right, list everything your audience wants you to talk about.

Now, circle everything that is on both lists. That’s what you talk about.

The stuff that’s only on your list? It’s a self-indulgent monologue. Your audience will be bored.

The stuff only the audience wants to talk about? That’s out of scope for this presentation. Either add it to your list if you decide it’s important. Or, set expectations with the audience that you won’t be covering that in your talk.

Or, do something really radical. Start by writing the audience’s list first. After all, you are presenting for the audience’s benefit, right? Start with a sincere and selfless “what’s in it for them” and you’ll have a sure winner.

Bonus: they will be more likely to think/feel/do something different afterward.

Now you have a topic list your audience wants to listen to. It’s time to write your presentation.

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.