Graph Makeover – Great Graphs Don’t Just Happen

Here’s a terrific post at the Forbes.com blog by Naomi Robbins, using a graph makeover to show that great graphs require thought; they don’t just happen. 

I loved Naomi’s advice, but I saw room for additional improvement. As an educational exercise to help you build your data visualization muscles, I offer below my suggestions.

First, here is the original graph, used with the permisson of information designer Beth Najberg of Beginnings Design.

Naomi very smartly advises that the first step is to determine what point am I trying to make?

In this case, the graph-maker was trying to convey that the cost of insurance for the oldest persons was 4.4 times the cost for the youngest persons. The rule-of-thumb in the industry is the highest cost insurance should not be more than three times the lowest cost (the base rate).

Was that point clear in the original graph? Here is Naomi’s makeover:

This makeover demonstrates a few smart principles

1. First, clarify the point you’re trying to make. Naomi does this in the graph title.

2. Emphasize that point where the price is three times the base rate. It’s challenging for a casual reader to find that point themselves. Naomi adds a leader line to emphasize that value.

3. Use a bar graph instead of a line graph. In general, people perceive a line graph to mean something changing over time, like stock quotes or a president’s approval rating. But when all the measures come from the same time period, a bar graph communicates that more clearly.

Naomi’s graph is a big improvement. Still, there is even more you can do. Here’s my additional revisions:

Let me explain my additional revisions:

1. Subdue the color of the bars. Dark colors attract attention, but the size of all the bars is not the focus of this slide; the difference between the first and last bars is the focus. So use a lighter color. 

2. Divide the bars into discrete blocks. It’s easier to see that something is 4.4 times larger than something else when you use 4.4 blocks for the largest item. I did this by creating a stacked bar chart that adds up to the total value, but you could do the same thing by just drawing white lines intersecting the bars. I also modified the y-axis to increments of $70, to make the block sizes meaningful.

3. Bold the values of the top and bottom bars. This is where you want to draw the eye’s attention. Don’t make the reader guess where you want them to look; emphasize those points.

4. Use lines to join the top and bottom values. You want to explicitly guide the reader to compare the top and bottom values. Lines subtly direct the eye to follow that path and make those connections.

This graph could be improved further. Do you see other ways to make the message clear? 

Great graphs don’t just happen. They require you to think through your main message, choose graphs that communicate the message instantly and use graphic design techniques to highlight what’s important and draw the reader’s eye through the graph.

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.

How to Print White Lines – PowerPoint Video Tip #13

So you’ve created a great-looking slide. But it may not look the same when they are printed as handouts. PowerPoint especially has trouble with white lines, like table borders and shape borders. But here’s a workaround so your handouts look just as sharp as your slides.

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.

Use “Smart Legends” for More Impressive Charts

I was inspired by this post by the Excel gurus at Chandoo.org to emphasize the importance of smart legends in charts.

What are smart legends? Well, legends do more than label your data. They can also be used to quickly summarize your message.

Look at this chart, showing U.S. tax revenues and expenses for the past 20 years, using the Excel default legends.

Not bad. Very clean. But you can do better if you use smart legends to summarize your key points.

Look at this updated chart, demonstrating the use of smart legends.

Smart legends summarize the key points in your data, using text, numbers and symbols. You can be creative in your use of smart legends.

Want your charts to be legendary? Then use smart legends to emphasize your key message the next time you create a chart.

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.

The #1 Time to Avoid Bullet Points

Here’s a pet peeve of mine, and a quick tip you can use to present your ideas more clearly. What’s wrong with this slide?

The problem is the use of bullets to enumerate a list. I see this all the time. The slide creator says there are x benefits or y trends or z competitive threats. Then they create the list using the default bullets points.

Instead, if you have three things to say, then don’t use bullets. Instead, NUMBER them.

There are 3 advantages to using numbers over bullets:

1. Continuity. The audience sees the word “three” in the title and then the numbers 1, 2, 3 in the list. There’s a sense of continuity from title to text.

2. Directing the Eye. You can verbally direct people through the slide by saying “Number one” and everyone knows which point you’re on. Audience members can also easily refer to each point when they’re making comments or asking questions. This is especially important if the list is long.

3. Feeling of Completion. A numbered list feels complete. A bulleted list feels incomplete, like these are three things to think about but there might be more.

So, next time you enumerate a list, don’t just use the default bullets. Instead, number the list and you’ll present your ideas more clearly.

About the author: Bruce Gabrielle is author of Speaking PowerPoint: the New Language of Business, showing a 12-step method for creating clearer and more persuasive PowerPoint slides for boardroom presentations. Subscribe to this blog or join my LinkedIn group to get new posts sent to your inbox.